How Do You Pray? A Retiree's Prayer Routine

My daily prayer routine has changed quite a bit since my husband and I retired.  We've found ourselves with more time in our days which means we were able to add in prayer time at different times throughout the day.  We've found that committing to this daily routine keeps us grounded and on track for the rest of our day.

Dandelions for Mary

Review of Take it To the Queen: A Tale of Hope

Spring in Kansas brings beautiful pink and white blossoms, bright green leaves, new blades of grass, and every young child’s flower of choice: the dandelion. There is usually no shortage of bright yellow blooms and white balls of fluff adorning our slightly neglected yard. Thus, to my daughter’s great delight, she can pick flowers whenever she chooses. Often, she brings the flowers over to me, and joyfully bestows her gift of a dandelion bouquet upon an all too grateful mother. They may be weeds, but when given with total love by a bright-eyed three-year-old, they seem more beautiful than the most gorgeous of roses.


When May arrived, I decided that we would spend a little time honoring and learning about Mary. We planted flowers in a small Mary garden and I purchased a new book. Take It to the Queen: A Tale of Hope width= by Josephine Nobisso is an allegorical account of Mary’s role in salvation and as our mother.  I wondered if the story might be a little advanced for my daughter, but she was captivated. At the end, without any prompting from me, she even asked if the story had a picture of baby Jesus. She must have grasped at least little pieces of the allegory.

The Madonna in Art

by Rev. Larry Rice, CSP


One of the most common themes in Western art is that of the Madonna and Child—a serene painting of the Blessed Virgin Mary, holding the child Jesus in her arms. But this image, so familiar that it has appeared on US Postal Service Christmas stamps nearly every year since 1966, was not always a staple of Christian art.


For most of the first three centuries of Christianity, the Blessed Virgin was usually depicted as part of a group of apostles, or as part of a Nativity scene; she was almost never alone or a central figure.  But in the fifth century, the Council of Ephesus addressed the Nestorian heresy, which claimed that, when Christ died on the Cross, it was only his human nature that experienced suffering and death. By extension, the Nestorians claimed that Mary was the mother only of Christ’s human nature and not
the Mother of God. The Council of Ephesus reinforced the Church’s long-held belief that Mary was the Mother of God and worthy of the Greek title “Theotokos.” Shortly thereafter, the Empress Eudocia sent a painting of the Madonna and Child home from the Holy Land and had it placed in the Church of Constantinople. This is the first historical mention of the Madonna and Child as an artistic subject. That painting was taken to Venice in 1202, to the Cathedral of St. Mark.


In subsequent centuries, the Madonna and Child has become one of the most popular themes in Western art. This popularity reflects the Church’s veneration of Mary for her role in our salvation and also for her place as an exemplar of the virtues of purity, humility, and faithful acceptance of God’s grace.


madonna image




Fr. Rice is the vocations director for the Paulist Fathers.
Copyright © 2015, United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. Reprinted with permission.

Fully Alive

Theology of the Body Series



Missed the first course? Can't make all 6 weeks?  That's okay - we'd still love for you to join us! 



Audio/video recordings and slideshow handouts will be available to those who miss a week, but want to catch up on what they've missed.*  If you want to join us after the first session, simply send a note to the presenter Kristin Bird, and she will send you the material to get caught up.


*Note:  Learners attending for Ongoing Formation credit through the Diocese who miss a week will be required to listen to audio recordings and present a one page typed response to the content covered on the week they missed in order to receive full credit for the course. 




Be inspired by St. John Paul II’s teachings on the meaning of life & the purpose of love!


 



Saturdays 9-11am

April 25, May 2, May 9,
May 16, May 23 and May 30


Location:
Most Blessed Sacrament
Oshkosh, WI


St. Peter Church - Aquinas Hall


(enter via doors on Pearl Ave)


 





In this 6-part series, learn more about the legacy left behind by St. John Paul II. This introduction to his Theology of the Body will explore these questions (and more):



  • What does Scripture reveal to us about who God is? About who we are?

  • Why do I have to go to Church? Why can’t I just pray by myself?

  • How is God’s Divine Design revealed in sacred art and architecture?

  • What exactly is God’s Plan for sexuality? What does the Church really teach about sex?


A Diocese of Green Bay Ongoing Catechetical Formation Course.


To register, contact Diocese of Green Bay Department of Education:
http://bit.ly/FullyAlive2015
920-272-8309
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


TOBflyerOshkosh

Why Do We Celebrate Easter for 50 Days?



Most people think of Easter as a single day. It’s never had the commercial appeal of Christmas, and because it always falls on Sunday, most people don’t get an additional day off from work. But for Catholics, Easter isn’t just a day, it’s a whole season. The Easter season stretches all the way to the feast of Pentecost. Lent, which sometimes feels like it’s stretching on forever, is actually forty days long. Easter, on the other hand, is all of fifty days long. About these fifty days theologian Nathan Mitchell writes:


‘The great fifty days of Pentecost are not an unwelcome, unrealistic obligation to “party on,” even if we don’t feel like it, but an invitation to explore more deeply “the weather of the heart,” to awaken our memory of God’s presence and power in our lives, to look more closely at all the rich and varied textures of creation.’


One way the church pursues this goal of seeing God present in the world is through the reading of the Acts of the Apostles. At Masses all through the Easter season, our usual practice of reading from the Old Testament is replaced be reading from the Acts of the Apostles. These readings tell the story of the church’s earliest days, and the beginnings of our faith’s spreading throughout the ancient world. These stories of heroism, controversies, persecutions and miracles all testify to the continued presence of the Risen Christ in the world, through the lives of his disciples, and the actions of the Holy Spirit.


All of this should be an encouragement and a sign of hope for us today. Despite war, violence, personal struggles, and an under-performing economy, God has not abandoned us, nor left us to our own devices. The risen savior is still with us. These 50 days of Easter ask us to reflect on his presence, and—even in the face of danger or fear—to live with joy.




by Rev. Lawrence Rice, CSP.  Originally published on ForYourMarriage.org. Copyright 2015 United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.  Used with permission.

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